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Jan 19 11 5:58 PM

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Sharing some information.

Working with Erythritol


Below is a link describing a blend using erythritol for cooking/baking.  Erythritol is known for its cooling effect (a minty-type flavor) when used entirely be itself, so that is why I am including this link for your review.


In the Sexy Forever book, Suzanne lists Polydextrose  as one of the do not use items, so the choice will be up to you.


Link:  http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/lowcarb-recipe-help-suggestions/460501-erythritol-conversions.html


Post by Bev-Ann


The little scoop that came with your stevia is 1/32 of a tsp and 80% is a standard strength of stevia sweetening power. A full tsp is supposed to be equivalent to 1 cup of sugar.
For each cup of sugar you are replacing, I would try the following:

1/2 cup polyd
1/4 cup erythritol
1/4 to 1/2 tsp stevia powder extract

Start out with only 1/4 tsp of stevia and work up to 1/2 tsp if it isn't sweet enough.

 




I never have to adjust the dry ingredients when using polyd but I have one recipe that has only water and canola oil for the wet ingredients and the polyd kept it from cooking properly. In that recipe, I reduced the polyd by half and it worked out. In recipes that have dairy and eggs, I don't have to adjust it.


Post by Kevinpa:


Originally Posted by Subject 117

Scott, I don't get it. Netrition told me I would have to use 1 and 1/3 cuy of Erythritol to equal 1 cup of sugar. If I put that amount in a recipe with, say, a 1/2 cup of PolyD, wouldn't that solve the sweetness issue? Or do I still need a third sweetener? My main goal is to remove "cooling effect" of Erythritol. Second is the sweetness. I don't have a big sweet tooth.

Thanks.


Let me take a stab at this 117.

It is true that 1 1/3 cups erythritol will give the equivilent sweetness of 1 cup of sugar.

It is also true that it would take about 1/2 cup of polyD to negate the cooling effect of that much erythritol.

Now here is were things go awry..... 1 1/3 cups of erythritol plus 1/2 cup polyD does not give you equal texture to that of 1 cup of sugar.

Considering that, the thing you are try to make will not come out as you expect. The sweetness may be right.....but the texture will not be.

Is that about right Scott?




Post by scott123:


1/2 C. of polyd won't negate the cooling effect of 1 1/3 C. of erythritol.

The cooling effect of erythritol is directly proportional to the quantity of polyd it's combined with. 2 parts polyd to 1 part erythritol (2/3 C. polyd + 1/3 C. erythritol) is a safe ratio. As you increase the erythritol, cooling becomes a far greater concern. I've done tests with 1 part polyd to 1 part erythritol syrups- the resulting crystallization/cooling effect wasn't off the chart, but it was substantial. 1 part polyd to 2 parts erythritol (1/2 C. polyd + 1 C. erythritol) will be cooling city/inedible. 2:1 is the magic ratio when dealing with polyd/e. Higher than that and you're asking for trouble.

1 1/3 C. erythritol plus 1/2 C. polyd equals the texture of about 1 2/3 C. sugar- quite a bit more than a cup. Both polyd, and, to a lesser extent, erythritol, are sweetness deficient. Using these two ingredients, by the time you reach a cup's worth of sweetness, you'll have way too much bulk/sugary texture. Hence the need for high intensity sweeteners like stevia.



Kevin, you're half right

1/2 C. of polyd won't negate the cooling effect of 1 1/3 C. of erythritol.

The cooling effect of erythritol is directly proportional to the quantity of polyd it's combined with. 2 parts polyd to 1 part erythritol (2/3 C. polyd + 1/3 C. erythritol) is a safe ratio. As you increase the erythritol, cooling becomes a far greater concern. I've done tests with 1 part polyd to 1 part erythritol syrups- the resulting crystallization/cooling effect wasn't off the chart, but it was substantial. 1 part polyd to 2 parts erythritol (1/2 C. polyd + 1 C. erythritol) will be cooling city/inedible. 2:1 is the magic ratio when dealing with polyd/e. Higher than that and you're asking for trouble.

1 1/3 C. erythritol plus 1/2 C. polyd equals the texture of about 1 2/3 C. sugar- quite a bit more than a cup. Both polyd, and, to a lesser extent, erythritol, are sweetness deficient. Using these two ingredients, by the time you reach a cup's worth of sweetness, you'll have way too much bulk/sugary texture. Hence the need for high intensity sweeteners like stevia.

I've also taken your/Bette's advice to scale back on the stevia


Here's how I'd approach it:

For 1 cup sugar

1/2 cup polyd
1/2 cup erythritol (1 C. powdered)
1/16 tsp stevia powder extract
2 T. xylitol (1/4 C. powdered)  (remember not dog friendly)


Posted by Kevinpa:


Well the one truism I can be sure of is that when I get to mixtures that are that high concentration of polyD ......I search for another solution.



MY THOUGHTS AFTER READING THE ABOVE POSTS:  It seems to me in order to try to use erythritol in a successful blend while baking, truly becomes a hit-and-miss adventure when trying to incorporate it with PolyD to help bulk up the mixture until it all comes together just right.


Since PolyD and sucralose, both, are on the do not use list of Suzanne’s it looks like a person is back to picking their own poison by trying to use more healthful type sweeteners when having to bulk them up with the use of PolyD or just use the “chemical-artificial” sweetener Splenda???


Then another thought to throw into the mix is if a person were to choose to use a liquid-sucralose type product, then you don’t have the bulk that the granular sucralose product would provide and then you are back to the same issue of not having enough dry ingredients to compensate for the wet in your recipe.


It gets too confusing for me… lol!


Link:  http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/lowcarb-recipe-help-suggestions/555756-erythritol-liquid-sucralose-conversion.html


erythritol + liquid sucralose conversion?


okay, I've spent more than an hour searching and can't find an answer to my question:
if I want to use both E and liquid S in a recipe instead of all granular
Splenda, what is the best ratio to use, or does it depend on each recipe? I definitely detect an aftertaste using all liquid S and read that combining it with E will help. But E has less sweetening power, correct? Also, do I have to add a little notSugar to any recipe I use E in to avoid "re-crystallizing" when the food cools? I have powdered E--does that matter in the conversion?

Response:


I can only tell you what I do - I start with the equivalent amount of E to sugar (e.g., if it calls for a cup of sugar, I use a cup of E) and then I start with the equivalent of 1/4 cup of liquid Splenda. Since E is generally about 80% as sweet as sugar, this seems to work pretty well.

I always taste batter or whatever it is before baking/cooking though so I can add a little more liquid Splenda if I need to.



Link:  http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/lowcarb-recipe-help-suggestions/582446-erythritol.html


Erythritol is 70% as sweet as sugar, so add additional sweetener accordingly. It is 0 on the glycemic index, and almost noncaloric. I always grind it before using to avoid recrystalization and that weird cooling effect. It causes the least stomach upset of any of the sugar alcohols, but I do know someone who can't tolerate it. It doesn't give me or my diabetic husband any problems either digestively or in terms of glucose levels.



do you grind before measuring out for a recipe? or measure and then grind?
for example, if a recipe calls for 3/4 cup of erythritol, which do you do first; grind or measure? haha could i make that more confusing? hopefully someone understood me



lol, ok i'll make it more confusing.

if the recipe calls for powdered, grind then measure.
if the recipe calls for granular, measure then grind.



Just for my edification, what is the advantage of grinding E for recipes that call for granular?


Powdered erythritol disolves better and re-crystalizes slower thus less noticeable cooling effect. At least in most cases anyway. There are still recipes that I prefer granular to powdered though.



kevin, just to make it interesting. . . what would you do if the recipe doesnt specify?


If a recipe doesn't say, especially if its one of mine, I assume granular.



http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/462757


1.       I use both stevia and erythritol, they are both natural and naturally occurring. Erythritol is a sugar alcohol, but because of the way it is absorbed by your body, does not cause intestinal problems that other sugar alcohols do. (Wikipedia is a good resource for more on the specific properties of both stevia and erythritol.) I have been using stevia for a while now, and have just begun to use erythritol -- it seems that there are very good results to be had by combining the two. Because erythritol looks and behaves like sugar, it is helpful in recipes requiring the bulking properties of sugar -- it is 70% as sweet as sugar though, and has what is called a 'cooling effect' in the mouth. Stevia is many hundred times sweeter than sugar (this varies depending on the brand and type, i.e., powdered, extract, etc.) and can have a bitter taste if too much is used. Using them together helps balance their negative and positive qualities, so that you can manage to get the physical qualities of sugar without the bitterness of stevia or the cooling effect of erythritol.

My latest experiment is lemon bars -- I just made my second batch -- and I had a great result, a very clean sweetness, with a very nice texture to the lemon curd. So far, the sugar conversion formula I'm using is roughly 1/5 erythritol, 4/5 stevia. By that I mean that I replace 1/5 of the total sugar required with its equivalent amount of erythritol, and the same with stevia. So, if I had a recipe that required 2 1/2 cups sugar, I would use the erythritol equivalent of 1/2 sugar, and the stevia equivalent of 2 cups sugar. It was a little confusing at first, but seems to work out well.

I am also planning on trying glycerine -- another naturally occurring sweetener -- and combining that with stevia.


http://emeraldforestxylitol.com/recipe_baking.htm


Remember xylitol is not safe for dogs to consume.


Baking Tips
Xylitol and erythritol can be substituted one to one in any recipe requiring sugar. Erythritol is not quite as sweet as sugar. Also, xylitol does not react with yeast; it provides nothing for the yeast to metabolize, so it won’t help bread rise. Xylitol and erythritol is heat stable which means it has a very high melting point.

Xylitol and erythritol don’t caramelize when baking so your finished baked goods may seem dryer. An easy solution is to add more liquid or lecithin, butter, or even xanthan gum to your recipe to retain moisture. Xanthan gum will keep sugar alcohols from crystallizing so we suggest sifting xanthan gum with xylitol or erythritol prior to adding liquid ingredients. Solid chocolates and some recipes that are exposed to air for long periods such as jams, or jellies will also show signs of re-crystallizing. Leave a cookie with xylitol out on the counter and it will become hard to the touch quickly.

Xylitol and erythritol can be ground into a powder and used in recipes requiring powdered sugar. Bakers can add corn starch, arrowroot, tapioca starch, or a touch of guar gum to powdered xylitol or erythritol and blend it all together.

To make frosting, substitute out the powdered sugar with erythritol or xylitol, add a pinch of arrowroot or guar gum and pre-blend to a fine powder. Use two parts by weight of powder to one part of shortening or butter for frosting.

To substitute for one cup of brown sugar, use 1/4 cup molasses and 3/4 xylitol or erythritol.


PET SAFETY FROM THEIR WEBSITE:


Pet Safety

Why Isn’t Xylitol Safe For My Pets
Chocolate is a good example of a food that’s safe for you, but bad for your pets. As any responsible pet owner knows, you never give chocolate to a dog, as their bodies just can’t handle it. Similarly, do not give xylitol to pets, because if they ingest xylitol they run the risk of going into hypoglycemic shock.

Should I Be Worried About Myself
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) states that xylitol is non-toxic for humans.

What Should I Do If My is not qualified to give pet owners veterinary advice. If your pet accidentally ingests any xylitol, immediately call your local veterinarian.

 

 Sweetener Comparison

What’s the Difference Between Xylitol and Erythritol?

Xylitol (zy–li–tall)

 

Erythritol (ah-rith-ra-tall)


• Made from U.S.-grown hardwood trees.

 

• Made from Sugar
– fermenting agent added.

• Safe for diabetics

 

• Safe for diabetics

• 2.4 calories per gram

 

• 0.2 calories per gram

• 75% less carbohydrates than sugar

 

• 0 carbohydrates

• 7 on the glycemic scale

 

• 0 on the glycemic scale

• GRAS
- General Recognized As Safe

 

• GRAS
- General Recognized As Safe

• FDA approved food additive

 

• FDA approved food additive

• 1:1 in place of sugar

 

• 2/3’s cup equals 1 cup of sugar

• Absorbed through large intestine

 

• Absorbed through small intestine

• Can be mixed with other sugars

 

• Can be mixed with other sugars

• As sweet as sugar

 

• 70% as sweet as Sugar

• Excessive use can cause mild laxative effect

 

• Highest digestive tolerance of all sugar alcohols



What is Erythritol?
Erythritol is a natural sweetener that looks and tastes like sugar yet has only 0.2 calories per gram – sugar has 3.75 calories per gram. Classified as a sugar alcohol or polyol, erythritol can be manufactured from starches or extracted from plants. It’s naturally occurring in our bodies, as well as in fruits, vegetables and certain fermented foods like yogurt and cheese.

Erythritol is approximately 70% as sweet as sugar and scores a zero on the glycemic index while sugar scores a 68. Therefore, erythritol does not affect blood sugar or insulin levels. Erythritol is unique among sugar alcohols as 90% of it is absorbed – but not metabolized – in the small intestine and then eliminated through normal bodily functions. As a result, it has the highest digestive tolerance of all sugar alcohols.

Using Erythritol
Erythritol is the ideal sweetener for coffee, tea, lemonade, fruit, or cereal. It can also be used in baking and cooking. It may be necessary to add more liquid when baking with it. Consider mixing it with other healthy sweeteners, like xylitol, to increase its flavor profile. Erythritol has a low molecular weight which means it won’t brown the way other sugars do when baked but it will extend the shelf life of products it’s used in.

Cathy


Seize the Day... It Only Comes Once... Live It!!!

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#1 [url]

Jan 19 11 8:15 PM

I'm going to read this very thoroughly tomorrow...right now I'm much too tired.  Just wanted to thank you cathy for providing amazing info for us all to read and consider


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#2 [url]

Sep 23 12 2:14 PM


Could you share the reasoning behind PolyD being on the "do not use" list. I'm entirely unfamiliar with it's pros and cons. 

Ultimately I'm just looking for a way to turn the erythritol I just purchased into an easily usable form for sweetening my coffee, tea, dressings, and saucesinstead of the agave I had been using up until now.

My key criteria are:

- Avoiding the cooling effect if possible
- Not using stevia (as even the best quality has an after taste i can't abide)
- No splenda, equal, sweet n low or the like
- Would prefer a shelf stable liquid solution if at all possible


I'm even open to mixing with natural sweeteners like maple and honey to just cut back some of the calories if it would make an easier to use syrup than zero or super low calorie altogether. (currently using 100% maple and honey so any caloric savings at this point is a bonus)

Thanks for any insight and experience you can share! 

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elora

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#3 [url]

Sep 24 12 11:04 AM

Hello Numystic!  I recently discovered Nectresse, a sweetener made from Monk Fruit.  Nectresse is made by the Splenda company, but since it comes from the Monk Fruit, they call it natural.  I bought it at Walmart both in granular and in liquid.  I cooked with it and there is no after taste for me, also seems very sweet.  I do believe that it has been around for a long time by another name which sounds oriental or Asian, I can't remember the name, but you could search for it.  I have been playing around with sweetener combination that hold their sweetness when baked.  I find combining sweeteners gives the best product.  I still use Fructose, but in small quantities as it was one of the products in the SS books that was approved.  Elora

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#5 [url]

Sep 25 12 11:21 AM



Oh and the often used chinese name for monk fruit is Lo Han.

Lakanto is an Erythritol / Lo Han blend without any sugar added that has been out for quite some time.

In fact it was Lakanto's positive reviews (and high price) that had me researching Erythritol on it's own in the first place!

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elora

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Posts: 78

#6 [url]

Sep 26 12 7:13 AM

Thanks, I knew it was Lo Han, but just couldn't recall it at the moment.  Walmart carries a liquid form of the Nectresse, that, like Splenda liquid, does not have the added ingredients, I believe.  I have, refering to my previous post, been using Fructose again.  Some recipes work beautifully with fructose, and other also need the combo of sweeteners.  Since I am in the over forty catagorie I do add carbs to pro/fats meals, I need the energy.  I made an almond meal/oat flour cake with the fructose.  My husband is diabetic, and it does not spike his sugars.  I have managed to take off 45 pounds in less than 7 months on this plan, but a lot of inches and a great deal of toning.  SSing is the plan for me, never hungry and love all the feedback from everyone here.  Make it a great day! Elora <><

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#7 [url]

Sep 26 12 2:16 PM

Hi Elora, would you kindly check the actual ingredients on your liquid because I cannot find any formulation of Nectresse anywhere including on the official site that does not include sugar and molasses. I'd be thrilled if there was one.

That aside, I'm still hoping someone will answer my original question about PolyD. 

Why is it on Somer's "Do Not Use" list? What are the negatives associated with PolyD?

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elora

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Posts: 78

#8 [url]

Sep 27 12 11:08 AM

I just checked the ingredients on the liquid Nectresse, numystic, and the good news is:  water,monk fruit extract,malic acid,sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate, the last three being stabilizers and preservatives.  I am going to research the PolyD, I have read about it on the low carb forums but am not familiar with it.  if I get anything informative I will post.  Elora<><

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elora

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#9 [url]

Sep 27 12 11:22 AM

Well, here is my take on PolyD.  It is a dextrose type sugar which is glucose.  The added fiber result in a slower metabolic absorption rate.  When considering pure cystalline fructose or glucose, glucose appears to act more like traditional table sugar in the body the only caveat being the added fiber in the PolyD which would then change the entire nature of the product to a certain degree.  Glucose is often given to rehydrate patients, along with electrolytes, in the hospital, not bad for them.
I think I will buy some PolyD just to experiment,  I do use fructose in moderation, but would be curious as to see the results of PolyD since I see there is a combo of PolyD and Erythritol sold as "the perfect baking duo".  I can always use more fiber. 

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#10 [url]

Sep 29 12 11:18 PM

Thanks so much for getting back with all that info!

I'll pass on the Nectresse as I avoid chemical preservatives as much as possible. I did find a source for pure monk fruit in a liquid extract with the only addition being vegetable glycerin. It's called SweetFruit drops from Dragon herbs:

http://www.dragonherbs.com/prodinfo.asp?number=011

I bought mine from iHerb which offers free shipping if you order enough. 

Will definitely look further into PolyD as the combo of that and erythritol does sound promising. 

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3 little words

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#11 [url]

Oct 8 12 3:00 PM

QUESTION:  If a natural sweetener is slower to spike insulin when fiber is added, can it be ANY fiber present in the food eaten at the time of use OR  must i specificallyt be the fiber they add directly in making the product?  See what I mean? isn''t eating these sweeteners  with other fiber foods going to do the same thing and slow the sugar response down anyway?    sandi

HOOT! Trying to catch up in reading here... feeling like a fish out of SSizing water for now.

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#12 [url]

Oct 9 12 2:51 PM


There's no question that eating a high amount of fiber (ideally BEFORE rather than during) will help to counteract the blood sugar spike. 

This is actually one of the cornerstones of the so called "sugar blocker" diets you can find with a few seconds and Google. It's also one of the reasons that eating sweets as dessert is somewhat less destructive than having a sweet snack on it's own between meals. 

All of that said, even the highest fiber/protein meal imaginable beforehand is not going to make a triple hot fudge sundae advisable or healthy. You can mitigate to a small degree the blood sugar spike, but this doesn't do anything to inhibit the insane amount of entirely empty calories contained therein. :)

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3 little words

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#13 [url]

Oct 16 12 12:32 PM

I avoid ALL sugar, numystic.  The thought of that dessert you mentioned turns my stomach. My question pertained to the sweeteners that have added fiber. I don't understand why they add the fiber when our other foods eaten have fiber in them. Doesn't the food fiber do the SAME thing in slowing the insulin response? Say natural sugar in tomatoes and sweet bell tri-colored peppers eaten... along with romaine and baby kale plus a dressing with a natural sugar sub based on lactose such as SomerSweet or Whey Low. Lots of good fiber...so isn't the insulin response slowed due to the fiber in the meal itself without needing fiber in the sweetener too?     sandi

HOOT! Trying to catch up in reading here... feeling like a fish out of SSizing water for now.

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#14 [url]

Oct 17 12 4:28 AM

Sugar substitutes use fiber as a filler because the actual sweetening element is so minuscule and so much sweeter than regular sugar that you'd have to be measuring out an impossibly small amount if it wasn't cut with a bulking agent. 

Pure stevia for example is 300 times sweeter than sugar so a bulking agent is a necessity for it to be used on a practical basis in powder form. Same thing is done in liquid with either veg. glycerine or another carrier providing the bulk.

Any company that is promoting the fiber angle is just taking advantage of the fact that they had to use something to add bulk so why not get extra marketing mileage out of it. 

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3 little words

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#15 [url]

Oct 17 12 11:19 AM

Thank you numystic for your quick reply.....so back to the original question, does the presence of food fiber in a meal ALSO slow insulin response in the natural sweeteners ( as the filler types are said to) so that if X-Agave ( natural)  were used or PCF (natural), they would be no more a problem to losing than say.... Stevia ( natural)?  I heard a discussion once about Volcanic Agave being slower to spike insulin than other agaves, but I have never seen such a product by that name. My sister gifted me with X-Agave and the  info says it is slow to spike insulin...so I have used it a couple of Xs in baking. I have been on a sweetener quest for several yrs, for  a natural  one I can use in ALL situations and still be assured insulin won't spike and cause a problem in losing. If one has no icky taste with acidics, it might  have no properties that help with baking. Splenda was my choice for all things for yrs, but I still looked for something natural as some ppl fear the chlorine connection, even though some say it is not a problem due to the size of the molecules and nothing dangerous transfers. WHo can trust THAT? So the bulk in Splenda works with baking, the flavor is great even with acidic things, the cost is about the same as other sugar subs, but it has the chlorine connection. I have X-Agave, Whey Low, powdered/granular/for ice cream/ and Gold ( amAzing brn sugar replacement), and Nu-Stevia. I've tried Truvia, Ideal, Zero....just about everything but SomerSweet ( w/ or w/out AceK), Xylitol  and liquid Splenda ( Erithritol)....and the newest on the scene someone mentioned the other day. Nutresse? 

Do you think ANY of the natural sweeteners ( with or without fillers added), would be SO slow to spike insulin if eaten in conjunction with fiberous foods, that we don't even have to worry about them spiking insulin at all?   Just trying trying to cut through the mumbo jumbo .      sandi 


PS.
Suzanne always said the slightest trace of sugar present could send a fatty meal directly to storage in cells... and if that is so...the fiberous meal would still need to be light in fat to prevent a gain, I suppose.

HOOT! Trying to catch up in reading here... feeling like a fish out of SSizing water for now.

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#16 [url]

Oct 17 12 1:57 PM

My original answer addresses whether fiber in food would slow to some degree insulin response in any sugar… but it doesn't matter how much fiber is in a meal when you're taking about agave vs something like stevia or splenda! 

Agave is as high in fructose as corn syrup! Despite the marketing hype about it being lower on the glycemic index countless diabetics who monitor blood sugar after meals have reported insane spikes after eating goods sweetened with agave, plus there is a link between agave specifically and fatty deposits in the liver. You can read more about Agave's dangers in this article which lists all it's cited sources:

http://rawchefdan.typepad.com/rawchefdan/2008/12/agave-nectar-the-high-fructose-health-food-fraud.html

So again, fiber eaten with it would slow it to a SMALL degree, but no amount of fiber is going to lower that blood sugar spike to a reasonable enough level to make using it (or any other high carb high fructose/glucose sweetener) vs something like Stevia or or any of the sugar alcohols (all the "itols") which are virtually calorie, carb, and sugar free altogether. 

It sounds like Stevia is exactly what you're looking for even without having fiber heavy food. Even without fiber in the meal it doesn't create significant sugar spikes and in fact supposedly helps to regulate blood sugar with regular use. 

The best powdered version we've tried ourselves is the NuStevia brand you mentioned. Specifically the white stevia powder from them. 

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3 little words

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#17 [url]

Oct 17 12 5:50 PM

Thanks for this AWESOME link. I soaked up the info and it addressed so MANY questions I have had. I shared with my sister as she still orders X, blue and white agave...and since she has had some bleeding, I'm hoping this will help her make a few changes.  I never saw or used PCF but last yr a SSizer  used it sparingly and also discussed inulin, which added to my confusion. Search discussions on this forum for more on those.  If we could get ANYthing straight on this forum, the sweetener question would be the puzzle to solve!  Dairy confused me to no end when first SSizing but that shifted to sweeteners soon afterward. The Stellas swear by Splenda and Jon Gabriel uses Xylitol ( dangerous to dogs though!!.... keep these crumbs, candies, and  gums out of their reach).         sandi  
 
I have the Nu-Stevia and  don't like it with the acidic things and have no clue how to use it in baking, ( may check that online for equivalents) but love it on berries and used to use it on cereal when I ate the good carb ones. Hubby tried it and wasn't thrilled, but I am the one determined to use Splenda less.   The 2 times I tried the XAgave with baking, I used about 1/4 cup and the rest was Splenda..... because I feared the sugar spike and it was in an almond cookie recipe from the Stella Style low carb site.  NOW after reading that article from 2008, I'm afraid of it for many more reasons.  I still lean toward the Whey Low products and have never had a slowed progress from using them....but have to plan ahead if adding to cold creamy things like whipped cream, so it can dissolve properly. The ratio to sugar is the same and it is fine with acidic things. Their ice cream version really is effective compared to harder results from Splenda.   sandi 

HOOT! Trying to catch up in reading here... feeling like a fish out of SSizing water for now.

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